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  #1  
Old 01-31-2009, 01:40 PM
oisinirish's Avatar
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Default Bed Floor Panel Replacement

Started

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1986 K5 4X4 Blazer
305 CID Rochester Quadrajet
  #2  
Old 02-05-2009, 09:40 AM
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Default RE: Bed Floor Panel Replacement

Well I went ahead and pulled all the interior trim, fixtures and carpet. An this is what I found.
[IMG] http://photobucket.com/pre-reapair_rust_86k_5

I figure I can just cut out the sheet metal for the floor pans and side but I'm thinking my best bet for the body mount brackets, which is really hard to see in the photos, is to buy new ones from LMC anybody got a better suggestions?
And looks like the old Ziebart undercoating has been sprayed all over the (*&%^ place. Any good ways to remove this so I'm not getting high while I weld?
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  #3  
Old 02-22-2009, 10:58 PM
 
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Default RE: Bed Floor Panel Replacement

im in the same boat right now too, i just cut the tailpan out and a little bit of the floor, but found that the place where the tailpan meets the boxside is all rusted to hell so now its new boxsides, i really wish i hadn't started this, but i guess ill learn from this mistake. Is your blazer Tan on brown, mine is the exact same, even has the exact same rust on it!
  #4  
Old 02-23-2009, 01:09 PM
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Default RE: Bed Floor Panel Replacement

Yep. Same color and everything. My tail pan doesn't seem to bad as yours though. Just at the corners. Figure I'll just cut out the crap and weld some new steel in. I was hoping to find a salvage yard nearby where I could rob some parts but the DC area only seems to have cars. or it could be that all the parts for theses vehicle have been bought already by other people in the same boat. Even 80's pick ups are impossible to find. I guess it's LMC and JC whitney for me. Gonna start cutting here today so we'll see just how bad it REALLY is.


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Old 02-24-2009, 06:52 PM
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Default RE: Bed Floor Panel Replacement

Well okay that last "Started" my have been a bit premature. Now we're into it in earnest. Will definitely be slow going as I just completed my first ever "real" weld. I don't count welding 3/4' steel together with dirt dobber's nests. But after a "few" tries I think i'm on the right track. What a pain the you know what when one burns through. Oh well build up and grind down til it's right. I think it probably would have been easier to remove the tailgate to do this but I don't really have a secure place to store the truck so it's not worth taking it off and putting it back on everyday. I'm photo-document everything to help me learn from my...ahem mistakes. If anybody sees anything that might help please speak up.

Here's progress so far:
http://photobucket.com/86k5inprogress


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Old 02-24-2009, 07:48 PM
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Default RE: Bed Floor Panel Replacement

Looks good. What are you using for a welder? Wire size? I use 0.023 wire for sheet metal and I will typically start out right on the recommended amperage and wire speed for the material thickness.

One thing to always do with sheetmetal is to do very small spot welds and jump around a lot to keep the heat down. For the piece you were working on, warpage will likely not be a problem, but by keeping the heat down, you will be less likely to blow through.
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Old 02-24-2009, 08:47 PM
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Default RE: Bed Floor Panel Replacement

.023??...no wonder I'm struggling. Using the roll of .035 innershield that came with it. I figured the tailpan steel was thick enough to handle it. I'll have to check out some thinner stuff.

Put a drop box out by the HWY sometime and when I drive through I put some beer in it.
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Old 02-25-2009, 12:33 PM
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Default RE: Bed Floor Panel Replacement

You can weld with 0.035 wire, but it will take a bit more heat with it. 0.023 is just easier with the thinner stuff.

So you are using flux core? Do you have a gasless MIG or do you also run shielding gas? What is the welder you are using?

Some people have had great success with running a flux core wire with sheetmetal, but I have never been fond of it. I have put quite a bit of wire through my Miller 140 and I prefer C25 with 0.023 wire for sheetmetal. Get up to 1/8" and I will use 0.035" solid core wire. I do not like flux core unless it is too windy where I am welding for shielding gas to do its job properly. That is the only case where I will use it.
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Old 02-26-2009, 09:43 AM
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Default RE: Bed Floor Panel Replacement

I'm using the Lincoln 140HD.
Couldn't find .023 in flux cored so tried the .030. What a difference. Still can't really run a bead more than an inch at a time but that might just be me. I'm not patient by nature so it took me awhile to figure out to weld spots or really short runs at a time. Practically cut my time in half. What's difference using shielding gas a solid core wire versus flux core?
The welder is equipped to handle shielding gases, even came with the hoses and regulator. Lincoln's "Innershield" at .030 wire seems to do a pretty good job.

Update from last night.

http://photobucket.com/86k5inprogress


The fun begins today welding the thin stuff together.
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Old 02-26-2009, 10:01 AM
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Default RE: Bed Floor Panel Replacement

The biggest difference, IMO, between flux core and solid wire is that you do not have slag left behind to protect the weld. What you see is what you get. You also have better control of the heat with a solid wire since you can go to a smaller wire to keep the heat affected zone small. With smaller wire, you also have the ability to create a shallower weld pool which will minimize the tendency to burn through as well as the work required to level the weld afterwords.

When I mentioned C25 earlier, that is 25% CO2, 75% Argon for the gas I use. Typical for mild steel welding.

Here is a snippet from Lincolns FAQ:
Quote:
Q: Does shielding gas affect the quality of the finished weld?

A: For most mild steel applications, CO2 will provide adequate shielding, but when you must have a flatter bead profile, less spatter or better wetting action, you may want to consider adding 75 to 90% argon to your CO2 shielding gas mix.

Why? Argon is essentially inert to the molten weld metal and therefore will not react with the molten weld metal. When CO2 is mixed with Argon, the reactivity of the gas is reduced and the arc becomes more stable. But, Argon is more expensive. In production welding, selecting the perfect shielding gas can be a science of its own. Attributes such as material thickness, welding position, electrode diameter, surface condition, welding procedures and others can affect results.

Common gas mixes for the home hobbyist and small fabricator would be: [ul][*]100% CO2 -Lowest price, generally greatest penetration, and higher levels of spatter. Limited to short circuit and globular transfer.[*]75% Argon - 25% CO2 -Higher price, most commonly used by home hobbyist and light fabricator, lower levels of spatter and flatter weld bead than 100% CO2. Limited to short circuit and globular transfer.[*]85% Argon - 15% CO2-Higher price, most commonly used by fabricators, with a good combination of lower spatter levels and excellent penetration for heavier plate applications and with steels that have more mill scale. Can be used in short circuit, globular, pulse and spray transfer.[*]90% Argon - 10% CO2- Higher price, most commonly used by fabricators, with a good combination of lower spatter levels and good penetration for a wide variety of steel plate applications. Can be used in short circuit, globular, pulse and spray transfer.[/ul]
TRY C-25 SHIELDING GAS (75% Argon, 25% CO2 )

Q: Are there any other tips you can provide for higher quality MIG welding?

A: Try a smaller diameter wire. Although the most common diameters of welding wire are .035” and .045”, a smaller diameter wire usually will make it easier to create a good weld. Try an .025” wire diameter, which is especially useful on thin materials of 1/8” or less. The reason? Most welders tend to make a weld that is too big - leading to potential burn through problems. A smaller diameter wire welds more stable at a lower current which gives less arc force and less tendency to burn through. If you keep your weld current lower, you will have a greater chance of success on thinner materials. This is a good recommendation for thinner materials; but be careful using this approach on thicker materials (>3/16”) because there may be a risk of lack of fusion. Whenever a change like this is made, always verify the quality of the weld meets its intended application.
CLICK HEREfor another article from Lincoln about GMAW (MIG) vs FCAW (Flux-cored).

IMO, get yourself an 80cuft bottle of C25 and some 0.023 or 0.025 wire (proper drive rollers and tips may be required). In NY, the largest bottle you can own yourself is an 80cuft bottle. I have wondered many times if I should have just leased a tank, but oh well... I need to get mine filled again...

As far as technique goes, I would not be trying to weld anything more than 1/8" to 1/4" tops every time you strike an arc. Move around A LOT to keep the heat down. This is key with welding sheetmetal, especially old sheetmetal that may be an inconsistent thickness onto new sheetmetal.
Old 02-26-2009, 10:01 AM
 
 
 
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1983, blazer, chevy, door, floor, front, k5, pan, panels, pans, rear, repair, replacement, replacements, rocker


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