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Report: Installing GPD (Global Parts Dist.) 9612779 A/C Compressor & Component Kit

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Report: Installing GPD (Global Parts Dist.) 9612779 A/C Compressor & Component Kit

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Old 06-08-2018, 12:33 AM
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Default Report: Installing GPD (Global Parts Dist.) 9612779 A/C Compressor & Component Kit

UPDATED 2x (see end of original post)

Hi all,

Today I finished installing the GPD (Global Parts Distributors) pn 9612779 A/C Compressor & Component Kit and other parts. The compressor in the kit is a Sanden style kit that many like over the OE HT6 style that is prone to leaking at the middle of the body. Since the core component, the compressor, is not an OEM style part I thought I'd report my experiences with the installation.

In principle the the job is easy but there were a few things that make it more difficult than I anticipated. This job was done on a 1999 Blazer with the Auto Climate Control.

Something not mentioned unless you dig a bit is that the compressor tubes/hoses must also be replaced since the muffler, the can in line with one of the lines, cannot be flushed. Also it is strongly recommended, and likely necessary to have the warranty to be valid, to also replace the condenser.

Of the major tasks, physically it was the condenser that was the biggest pain to do since you have to remove the radiator and disconnect all the hoses and tubes that go to it. This also was the messiest part.

It is also worth noting that most instructions mention pouring out the oil from the old pump to know how much to put into the new one. This advice is only valid for when no other component is being replaced as the balance of the total charge of oil will be in other parts of the system. For a complete rebuild with flushing of the evaporator and evaporator tube (no other parts are flushable) you have to put in the total amount of oil as designated on the label on the side of the pump. For this pump it is 6.4 oz, not the 8.0 oz as the manual designates. It is recommended that when the evaporator is flushed, it is best to pump for 3 hours. This rids the system of any remaining flush liquid by having it evaporate into the vacuum created by the pump.

Regarding the serpentine belt; you will need to get a new slightly longer one. The one suggested in the instructions that came with the compressor was too long. I determined the appropriate length by the marks on the tensioner pulley. For new belts, the mark on the fixed part should line up with the wide mark and for a use belt, the mark should be between the wide mark and the narrow mark. The new recommended belt was at the outer mark with the used OE recommended belt being just inside the new belt band mark. I split the difference on the lengths and used a 960K6 (96.0 in inside length) belt which when installed had the fixed mark just a bit above the wide new belt mark. I suspect a 955K6 belt could also work. If you don't turn on the engine, your parts store might let you return the belt if it doesn't fit. (http://www.s10forum.com/forum/attach...etch-limit.jpg)

As for what happened to my system that prompted the fix; I thought I had a leak but actually what I had was a compressor disintegrating with small black bits creating a sludge that blocked the orifice tube. If you think your system has leaked, I would still recommend you take it to an auto AC shop to have the system emptied.

Below is a bullet-point listing of the parts, tasks, advice, and tools that I used and/or thought anyone else who would do the same job might benefit from seeing.

New Parts:
  • GPD (Global Parts Dist.) pn 9612779 A/C Compressor & Component Kit (consisting of):
    • pn 6512124 A/C Compressor
    • pn 1411295 A/C Receiver Drier / Accumulator
    • pn 1321276 A/C System O-Rings, Seals, & Gasket Kits
    • pn 3411243 A/C Orifice Tube
  • GPD pn 4811526 A/C Hose (see below)
  • OSC 4560 A/C Condenser
  • Serpentine belt size 960K6 or 955K6 (OE is 950K6) (see “Musts” below)
  • Retaining snap rings for transmission and oil cooler line connectors to radiator.

Musts:
  • Must install extra spacer washers for mounting compressor so to have no interference of bottom of compressor with AC compressor mounting bracket.
  • Must get longer serpentine belt. (960 or 955 vs 950 length)
  • Must get correct oil, PAG-46, (the AC-Delco OEM oil 15 118 is not correct for the GPD compressor; it is PAG-150, a higher viscosity).
  • Must get new compressor hose set because mufflers cannot be flushed.
  • Must get new condenser to keep warranty.
  • Must check oil level in compressor. The new total system capacity is 190 ml = 6.4 oz, not the 8.0 oz for the OEM installation but the compressor is shipped with 4.5 oz to 5.0 oz.
  • Must flush evaporator and evaporator tube line.

Mights:
  • Might need to bend rigid part of compressor hose set to make fit and clear compressor mounting bolt.

Advice:
  • Check AC gauge set. The one I borrowed had one of the thick o-rings mashed preventing the refrigerant going into the system.
  • Check that your tap valve for the cans fits. I had cans on which the threads were not formed correctly and the valve would not fit.
  • Remove battery and battery tray to get easier access to connectors on radiator and condenser.
  • I purged the supply line for each new can of refrigerant.
  • I was fooled for a bit that I needed to keep flushing the evaporator because the flushing fluid that came out of the old heater hose I used on the outlet discolored the fluid. As such, perhaps only 1 quart of flush was necessary but I ended up using two.

Tools: (in addition to standard hand tools)
  • (2) large adjustable wrenches or 20 mm , 24 mm, 27 mm, and 32 mm wrenches
  • A/C gauge set*
  • Vacuum pump*
  • UV leak detector kit*
  • Orifice tube extractor tool*
  • AC flush tool*
  • Air compressor for flush tool
  • Refrigerant can tap, GPD 5811248 Can Tap
  • Clean container into which to drain compressor oil
  • Container that can measure up to about 8 oz. in 0.5 oz. increments or equivalent in milliliters.
*borrowed from Autozone

Consumables used:
  • (2) 12 oz. cans R-134a refrigerant with no additives
  • (1) 12.3 oz. can R-134a refrigerant with UV leak detector fluid
  • (2) quarts AC system flush solvent, GPD 8011256 A/C System Flush
  • PAG-46 oil, 8 oz., NAPA pn TEM 801234 to top of oil in compressor


UPDATE 2018-06-24: I noticed that one of the rigid tubes on the the GPD compressor hose is rubbing a hole in the insulation on the underside of the hood. I'll be contacting GPD to complain.

UPDATE 2018-06-28: I've been in contact with GPD and they are going to send me a new hose set. I also sent a quote to get a pre-emptive reimbursement for having the part swapped out at a local shop so I don't have to do this. I suspect they are willing do to this since they are appreciative of learning how to modify their part. The new part does not have a muffler and has a smaller arch. (With no muffler, the hose could be flushed.) Pictures of the older and now redesigned part are included in a later post.

(I've added these updates to the bottom of the thread too.)
 

Last edited by christine_208; 07-01-2018 at 05:37 PM. Reason: updating information about poor part fitment.
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Old 06-08-2018, 12:47 PM
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Nice! I honestly didn't know that autozone had vacuum pumps and flushing equipment on their loaner list! Nice to see someone do a compressor right! Most people just throw another one on and clean out nothing. Then the circulating debris takes out the new pump later that year.
 
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Old 06-08-2018, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Lesmyer View Post
Nice! I honestly didn't know that autozone had vacuum pumps and flushing equipment on their loaner list! Nice to see someone do a compressor right! Most people just throw another one on and clean out nothing. Then the circulating debris takes out the new pump later that year.
Thanks Les. That is high when coming from you. I hope to report after an upcoming long trip that it is all still working well.
 
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Old 06-10-2018, 10:24 AM
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Christine, I really like your complete list of all new parts with part no.s and the musts and might's and the unexpected snags we all run into along the way...... like the serp. belt! Being thorough and doing the job right the first time is cheaper in the long run. The flushing and cleaning steps are critical so, like Les said, you won't have to do this expensive job again in a year or so. In the southeast, next to having a reliable engine and transmission, a cold AC is essential. Thanks for detailing all that useful info for us. Jim
 
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Old 06-10-2018, 10:52 AM
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Nice write up, especially the part numbers.

I want to emphasis one element of Christine's write up - if you are taking the time to do all this work and return the system to its original glory, look for 134a without leak sealing additives (which most auto store cans have). I use straight 134a out of a 30 lb canister but if I remember correctly the Advanced Auto house brand has no additives.

George
 
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Old 06-10-2018, 03:41 PM
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The cheapest 12 oz. cans are pure refrigerant. I checked because my condenser leaked at the bottom and I saw an oil stain. I replaced the condenser and used a 16 oz. can that had some lubricant and a 12 oz. can of straight 134 a. 39 degree air blowing out the vents and the next day the compressor clutch squeaked. I sprayed some wd 40 on it and it went quiet. I ordered the same compressor kit to replace and upgrade before it blows and contaminates the whole system. Replacing an 18 year old compressor before it fails is the tip I'd contribute to this thread. I know the old preacher I bought my jimmy from didn't hot rod or off road, but I'm sure he beat the snot out of the A/C.

I also ordered an ac delco professional automatic adjusting orifice tube #1550120.

https://www.freeasestudyguides.com/f...fice-tube.html
 
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Old 06-10-2018, 05:03 PM
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Beware of 'A/C Pro' in the black can with hose and gauge for $35-40.00 range. As George says in post no. 5 above, you don't want [B]any product like A/C Pro or others with the sealant in it.[B] It's fine to use the one with the oil included. But if you use the AC Pro with sealant, you will have trouble if later you go to an AC shop for service. They don't want to use their equipment to 'evacuate the system' if you have ever put the sealant into your A/C system. A/C Pro is what they sell in the Advance Auto, AZ, O'Reilly's and so on.
 
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Old 06-12-2018, 12:58 AM
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I just did this on a Trailblazer. And have done my truck multiple times. This post makes the job seem much more than it is. It's all really simple stuff. 5 bolts to remove the compressor and the lines to it. Pull the radiator that takes about 20 minutes. Replace and hook up lines. Even replacing the lines, orifice tube and drier only takes a few minutes. Then pull a vac on the system and fill with freon.

It's not nearly as involved as the OP's post makes it out to be. I don't even think the factory service manual is that tedious.
 
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Old 06-12-2018, 08:28 AM
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The amount of work depends on if the system got contaminated with the crud of a blown compressor and/or if there are any leaks. I have 50k miles on a new compressor/accumulator/orifice tube/vacuum/charge but mine was a simple clean failure of the compressor with no leaks. I don't remember if my compressor required a new condenser for the warranty but I didn't replace it because it wasn't contaminated and it didn't leak.

I will say that in another area I did apply Christine's level of detail because of the safety concerns and high level of long distance highway driving. One rear axle had failed and the other one was still within reasonable tolerances but had the beginning of failure of the induction hardened bearing surface. I pulled them both and went with new axles, bearings, seals and brakes when others go with nothing, repair bearings, axle repair, pick and pay junk yard, etc. . It's all in what's important to you I guess.

George
 

Last edited by GeorgeLG; 06-12-2018 at 08:37 AM.
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Old 06-24-2018, 12:06 PM
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Quick update: I noticed that one of the rigid tubes on the the GPD compressor hose is rubbing a hole in the insulation on the underside of the hood. I'll be contacting GPD to complain.

(I'm adding this to the original post too.)

BTW, I suspect the stain in the insulation is from a leak in the original compressor.





 

Last edited by christine_208; 06-24-2018 at 12:36 PM.

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