Shop Tips and Tricks - Page 2 - Blazer Forum - Chevy Blazer Forums



The Lounge For casual talk about things unrelated to Blazers (ie. Off-Topic).

Reply
 
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #11  
Old 12-29-2016, 07:44 PM
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 7
ekaye1 is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by richphotos View Post
If you start to get angry because it seems like NOTHING is going as planned. Go inside, grab a beer, sit on the couch while swearing and think of how at that point you would love to see it burning in the street. Finish the beer, take a deep breath and go back at it.
Amen to that brother

While enjoying the "Brain Freeze" of that Ice cold one I have actually figured out some pretty ridiculously easy "work arounds"
Yesterday I started replacing the water pump in my 96 4.3 4x Blazer. Things were going great until I needed to break the bolts loose on the water pump pully. The belt was not tight enough to keep the pulley from rolling and I needed two hands to do it so I locked a box wrench on one of them and wedged it against the tensioner. It kept slipping off the tensioner and if I had hit it with a hammer it might have rounded a bolt. Halfway through the cold one it came to me.
On one end I wrapped duct tape to the box end to keep it around the bolt. The other end taped to the tensioner with a little pull to the rear. When I broke three bolts loose I just untaped the box end and fastened it onto one of the loose ones and got the last one loose.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-29-2016, 08:36 PM
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 7
ekaye1 is on a distinguished road
Cool

Another aha moment came in this project when I was trying to line up the bolts to secure the new water pump. I pride myself on using something slightly smaller to go down the hole that one of the bolts goes in. On the left side I used one of those really long headlight bolts [the 3/32" end in case I need it again]. In this case, holding the pump up with a bungee cord took most of the weight off.

i moved the other three "hole points" to guide one bolt at a time tipping the whole thing right, left, up and down.This is usually a great way of making an awkward thing easier to deal with while working alone. This pump felt like 8 or so lbs.

I rounded about 1/4" of the tip of the bolt nearest the power steering so I could feel it drop in before I could start threading. When I say rounded, it looked more like the tip of a 7.62 bullet. It popped into place and threaded right in. This is where things got real frustrating. I modified another bolt for the tensioner side but could not get it to pop in the top or bottom holes at all. These bolts were .35. My headlight long bolt was .23 and phillips head was .30 - I had the right tools but even the upper bolt on the PS side would not drop in and I could see it. Today was sunny, clear and 79 degrees and I had my shop light too. The idler pully was the only thing blocking my view of the other side. Time for another cold one

Then it came to me. I removed the Idler pully and used a small vanity mirror. It came with a real pretty handle on it for self haircuts and such but has been dropped so many times over the years that only the glass survived. Now I could se what I thought I understood before. The left side was not only crooked but the motor had recesses that felt like the probe bolts were going through. The rest of the reassembly was actually easier than my 79 full sized Jimmy so I changed the oil as well as the coolant and belt.

Last edited by ekaye1; 12-31-2016 at 06:39 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-30-2016, 06:23 AM
Thogert's Avatar
Moderator

 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Northern Utah
Posts: 4,312
Thogert has a spectacular aura aboutThogert has a spectacular aura aboutThogert has a spectacular aura about
Default

If you are really fighting a bolt that has no right being that tight while trying to remove it, make absolutely sure you are turning it the correct way. Been burned a few times fighting trying to loosen a bolt, while actually tightening it. Several that come to mind: fighting an upper ball joint castle nut for 45 min, starter bolt, and broke the head off a thermostat bolt while doing this too. Added about 5hrs of extra work getting that nub out of the block.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-30-2016, 10:26 AM
christine_208's Avatar
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Moscow, ID
Posts: 4
christine_208 is on a distinguished road
Default The Right-Hand-Rule for bolts and nuts

I want to second what Thogert posted about checking the direction of the bolt or nut to remove it. I think we've all been there!

When I am under the truck or contorted in some way to get to a fastener where the old rule "righty-tighty, lefty-loosey" is hard to apply, I use the Right-Hand-Rule.

The RHR is that if you curl your fingers on your right hand as if to make a fist, the direction your thumb points when pointing away from the hand (e.g. as if you were hitch-hiking) is the direction the bolt or nut will move when rotated the way your fingers have curled.

Of course this only works with fasteners that have right-hand threads. Those of you who work with pressurized gas cylinders know that for some specialty gases, the threads for the regulators have left-handed threads. Apparently in about 1970 Dodge thought it a good idea to use left-handed threads on some of their lug nuts/bolts! You have been warned! ;-)

Here is a picture:

Note this works for loosening or tightening.

Christine
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-01-2017, 11:23 AM
Thogert's Avatar
Moderator

 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Northern Utah
Posts: 4,312
Thogert has a spectacular aura aboutThogert has a spectacular aura aboutThogert has a spectacular aura about
Default

Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 01-03-2017, 11:27 PM
rockp2's Avatar
Senior Member
Thread Starter

 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 692
rockp2 is on a distinguished road
Default

I buy those tin foil type turkey basting pans from the grocery store. They have many uses but my two most common are: 1) put one under my brake rotor when I am spraying the caliper and rotor down with brake clean; 2) when I am doing a complete coolant drain, two or three of them can be strategically you positioned under the engine block when I pull the block drain plugs to catch most of the coolant. The pans are very cheap and reusable for quite awhile. Of course they could be used for a oil change. But I use a regular oil drain container for that.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 01-06-2017, 01:22 PM
Starting Member

 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Calgary , Alberta , Canada
Posts: 138
Strangerock is on a distinguished road
Default

A real good home penetrating fluid can be made from a 50-50 mix of ATF and acetone.....works allot better than some of the purchased brands.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 01-29-2017, 02:19 PM
Junior Member

 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: waterford, mich.
Posts: 442
Rusty Nuts is on a distinguished road
Default

I write the vin, chassis and rpo codes in a composition book. Then include everything I do to my jimmy. Date, mileage, part, warranty and store. Keep it with my envelope of receipts.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 01-29-2017, 06:50 PM
rockp2's Avatar
Senior Member
Thread Starter

 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 692
rockp2 is on a distinguished road
Default

Here's a safety tip that may be obvious to some. Recently I met someone who's face looked like someone had whipped him with red hot ****** wire and he had varying shades of red to black thick scabs all over his face with some of the wounds oozing dark fluid. He was self conscious of it and before he even greeted me he said "I had grinder explode in my face and this why I look like this." He proceeded to tell me that he put to hard of an angle on his angle grinder (cutting wheel if I remember correctly). Apparently this had happened a couple weeks prior and there will still splinter of the wheel working their way out of his face. He stated it had exploded into teenie splinters. Besides the obvious tip of "don't put too hard an angle on your cutting wheel", for a few dollars you can by a clear full face protector at Harbor Freight. I always where safety glasses, but up until then I really only used the face shield when I was doing some serious work (I do a lot of metal work on occassion). After that day, I add the full face shield even if I am doing only a few seconds of a cut or grind. Still wear my safety glasses under the shield also.
Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Any tips or tricks for heater core problems? Wexy21 Full Size K5 Tech 8 11-29-2012 10:05 PM
and tricks to rear end replace nicco89blazer Full Size K5 Tech 0 07-09-2010 09:28 PM
Tricks for passing emissions tests? ohsofly 1st Gen S-series (1983-1994) Tech 18 02-13-2010 02:21 AM
tips and tricks for dog hair? AtreyuManiac Detailing 11 04-02-2008 07:47 PM
gas gauge tricks??? skitzobmxr Engine & Transmission 8 06-04-2007 10:24 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:42 PM.