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leaf over lift

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Old 01-01-2011, 07:27 PM
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i was wandering if anybody might have a little info for me. i wanna do a little t bar crank but i cant remember or find it on the site. how many bolt turns is an inch and how many inches is an ok amount. I would also like to do a leaf over lift for the rear. im ok with shackels but am under the impression that essentially all that would have to be done is unbolt leafs from frame and axle turn over u bolts and put leafs on top of axle n bolt back up?
 
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Old 01-02-2011, 10:27 PM
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Springs can wear out so it's not like an exact measurement but it's generally accepted that one full turn of the adjusting bolt is approximately a quarter inch of lift. As far as how many is okay, that's a trickier question and one that can't really be answered. I would say not to crank more than you need to because with the tbars cranked, the CVaxles and balljoints are working at a steeper angle and will wear out faster.

I cranked up 7 full turns just to get my tires to fit but I'm lowering down some and I'm down to 4.5 turns right now. I didn't take any measurements so I can't say how much I gained from the initial crank or how much I lost from the subsequent lowering.


The spring over axle will get you more like 4-5" because of the thickness of the axle itself combined with the thickness of the leaf pack. The plate that the ubolts attach to also has the bracket for the shocks so you might need to modify that. I'm not sure if you can simply flip it to the top or not.
 
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Old 01-02-2011, 11:21 PM
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Old 01-03-2011, 09:52 PM
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thanks for the help finding those posts they wer quit helpful. maybe in the future i might start collecting the parts needed for a solid axle swap on my 96 blazer but for now i just wanted to get my frame a little higher cause we got about 4-5 feet of snow in south dakota. i was gunna do a cheap 2 inch body lift with 2 inch piece of pipe but havent gotten to it yet. well any advice is welcome..
 

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Old 01-03-2011, 10:03 PM
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if you are dealing with 4-5 feet of snow i suggest an older used snow cat


a body lift wont help you in clearing snow too much since your frame/axles/suspensiony parts will all be at the same height.
combine a 2" BL with a t-bar crank and lift shackles in the rear AND bigger tires should get you maybe an inch or two worth of gained clearance...tops.

for the cost of a SAS for your 96, you could just buy a beater truck for winter...
 
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