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Mixing Snow tires and AT Tires? Which set on rear?

  #1  
Old 07-28-2015, 01:20 AM
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Default Mixing Snow tires and AT Tires? Which set on rear?

02' Blazer, Highway driving, and Jeep Trails.
On vehicle are 2 brand new looking Cooper Discoverer M+S studdable snow tires (rear). Cooper's designated Snow tire.

Adding 2 Hankook DynaPro ATm 235/75R15XL.

As long as I'm not 4 wheeling on dry pavement, the transmission and transfer case should be fine? They are both P237/75/15, Passenger Tire rated, though the links go to LT's.

And if I'm on dirt, putting it into 4 wheel should not be a problem?

Which tires should I put front/rear? for best HWY control / stopping fast / dodging deer on 1,000 ft cliff drops in Colorado at 3a.m., (assuming both are brand new condition, though the Cooper Snow tires are a 2012 manufacture, they look new, not at all weathered or cracked. ) Best tires on rear, but which is best? Maybe one could argue that in a swerve, the stiffness of the front tire sidewall is the first and most critical factor? rolling a vehicle is what got me into this blazer and do not wish to repeat ever. Thought I was a very good driver, happens fast.

Snow tires will wear quickly in front, that fine if it's the safe call, I don't need to drive this vehicle that much, plus it will get me into the matching pair of Hankooks faster.

If there's a really strong argument for getting all 4 Hankooks, I'll consider that in the coming weeks. Of course it's better for the drive train in 4WD, but by how much? My main concern is the engine block is covered in oil and smokes into the cab enough to be a problem. 130k, no drips, maybe remnants of an old gasket repair, will inspect further. I'll give it a simple green soak (or...?)when I can. I found an excellent article about replacing tires on 4WD, link below. Still looking at replacing just 2 for now.

Thanks!

Tires>
Existing: 2 x Cooper Tire & Rubber Company - Discoverer M+S?

NEW: 2 x Find the Hankook DynaPro ATm Tire 235/75R15XL at Walmart.com. Save money. Live better.

The Discoverer M+S is Cooper’s premium studdable winter SUV tire designed for drivers looking for excellent traction on snow and ice

The Dynapro AT-M is Hankook's premium On-/Off-Road All-Terrain. A wraparound tread design gives traction in muddy and snowy conditions and helps guard against cuts and bruises

I found this excellent explanation of replacing tires on 4WD
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete....jsp?techid=18

summarizing: replacing all 5 at once, with regular rotation allows for 1 flat tire in the cycle and keeps all tires the same diameter. Otherwise differential/transfer case are always working, heat up, and will wear out prematurely.
 
Attached Thumbnails Mixing Snow tires and AT Tires?   Which set on rear?-tires.jpg  

Last edited by Blazonaire; 07-28-2015 at 06:39 PM.
  #2  
Old 07-28-2015, 02:10 PM
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plse. see above, edited. mod's please delete this reply, Thx.
 

Last edited by Blazonaire; 07-28-2015 at 06:41 PM.
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Old 10-07-2015, 04:10 AM
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When I went in to have these put on, the guy actually said there was a precedent established that in a case of Snow mixed with AT tires, the Snows must go in the rear, due to having better traction. He said that it was a tire regulation based on some previous situation. Sounds a bit strict and subjective (on tire brands, tread, etc) but he seemed like he knew what he was talking about. I'm sure some tire dealer is reading this now and probably laughing, ha ha, but anyway that's what they said when I was there, an independent tire dealer.

The AT's should wear a bit better in the front than the Snows will anyway (harder rubber). I'll probably still rotate them when it looks like it's time.
 

Last edited by Blazonaire; 10-07-2015 at 04:15 AM.
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Old 10-14-2015, 09:42 AM
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I'm no tire expert, but in snow and icy conditions I'd want the best cold weather traction tire (the snow tires) on the steering wheels. Snow tires are much more effective on snow/ice for braking & steering than an A/T tire, and they will still add driving traction when in 4x4. The A/T tires will be get harder once the temperature drops, which will increase your braking distance and the chances of skidding when braking.


One thing you can do with your Hankook A/T tires that may help some in the snow & ice is getting them siped (sp?). That adds extra grooves in the large tread blocks and should give better traction on cold slippery surfaces.


That's my 2 cents.
 
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Old 10-14-2015, 11:32 AM
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Originally Posted by El_Beautor View Post
I'd want the best cold weather traction tire (the snow tires) on the steering wheels.
Sir, that all makes a lot of sense. And considering your locality, Note taken, thanks for the insight.
 
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